@nd Hour Exam, April 2, 2014

Alma Mater/Spring 2014
2nd Hour Exam
April 2, 2014

Part I – Short Stuff – 20 Minutes
Link the academic personages in Column A to attributes in Columns B and C:

Column A – Personages

Column B

Column C

Annie Nathan Meyer Harvard psychologist-philosopher Funded Yale colleges, Harvard houses and Butler Library
Edward Harkness Vermont senator WW I anti-interventionist and critic of trustees
Woodrow Wilson Prime mover in founding of Barnard President of Princeton, 1904-10
William James Progressive era journalist WW I interventionist and critic of trustees
Frederick P. Keppel Philanthropist Promoter of land-grant colleges
Charles A. Beard Hopkins PhD 1881 “Twilight of Idols”
Elizabeth Milbank Anderson Psychologist Popularizer of the pragmatic method
Nicholas Murray Butler Columbia College dean Grappled with “Hebrew problem”
James McKeen Cattell political scientist – historian Leading early Barnard benefactor
Justin Morrill Spectator editor, 1931-32 Member of New York’s Sephardic Jewish community
Randolph Bourne Heiress to Borden Milk fortune Expelled for union organizing activities on campus
Reed Harris Columbia PhD in philosophy Prime mover behind College Entrance Examination Board

 

Column A – Personages

Column B

Column C

Annie Nathan Meyer  Prime mover of Barnard  Sephardic Jewish Community
Edward Harkness  Philanthropist Funded Harvard houses, Yale colleges, Butler Library
Woodrow Wilson  Hopkins  PhD 1881  Princeton president, 1902-10
William James  Harvard psychologist-philosopher  Popularizer of Pragmatic Method
Frederick P. Keppel  Columbia College dean  Grappled with “Hebrew Problem”
Charles A. Beard  Columbia political scientist  WW I interventionist and trustee critic
Elizabeth Milbank Anderson Heiress to Borden Milk fortune  Principal early Barnard benefactor
Nicholas Murray Butler Columbia PhD in philosophy 1884  Organizer of CEEB
James McKeen Cattell  Columbia psychologist  WW I anti-interventionist and trustee critic
Justin Morrill  Vermont senator  Author of Land Grant Colleges Act
Randolph Bourne  NYC journalist and
CC graduate
“twilight of Idols”
Reed Harris Spectator editor, 1931-32  Expelled for anti-adminsitration editorials

 

I. B. Link the following institutional foundings with their prime movers and date of founding:

Institution

Founding Benefactor

Ist Administrative head

Year of Founding/Opening

Johns Hopkins Ezra Cornell Daniel Coit Gilman 1865/1868
Stanford Leland Stanford Ella Weed 1876
Barnard College John D. Rockefeller M. Carey Thomas 1885
University of Chicago None Wm. Rainey Harper 1889
Cornell Philadelphia Quakers David Starr Jordan 1885/1891
Bryn Mawr Johns Hopkins Andrew Dickson White 1891

 

Institution

Founding Benefactor

Ist Administrative head

Year of Founding/Opening

Johns Hopkins Johns Hopkins  Daniel Coit Gilman  1876
Stanford  Leland Stanford David Starr Jordan  1885/1891
Barnard College  None  Ella Weed 1889
University of Chicago John D. Rockefeller Wm. Rainey Harper  1891
Cornell  Ezra Cornell Andrew Dickson White  1865/1868
Bryn Mawr Philadelphia Quakers  M. Carey Thomas  1885

 

Part II.  Mid-Sized Stuff – 20 Minutes — Choose three and respond with three or four sentences/ bullets.

a. What were F. A. P.  Barnard’s views on the education of women?

b. What were William James’s views on the PhD?

c. What were George Santayana’s views on Yale?

c. What were John Dewey’s views on pacifism and non-interventionism in 1916-17

d. Which of the university’s constituencies did the rise of football bring together?

e. What was Randolph Bourne’s complaint with his professors?

Part III. Longer Stuff —  40 Minutes — Respond to two of the following propositions with two 20-minute critical essays in which you take a considered position.  Facts welcome.

a. The rise of the university in the late 19th century is best  accounted for by pointing out the intellectual shortcomings of the ante-bellum colleges that preceded them. On this all contemporary observers of academe were agreed.

b. The return of the colleges in  the 1920s is best accounted for by pointing out the intellectual failings of the turn-of-the-century universities that preceded them. On this all contemporary observers of academe were agreed.

 

c. Efforts in the interwar era to limit the admission of Jews to academic institutions founded, funded and governed by Protestants were both understandable and defensible. And besides, the means by which Jews were excluded were relatively non-punitive.

d. As of 1940, America’s leading colleges and universities had yet to demonstrate that they had made good use of all the  financial resources, public and private, lavished on them. To the contrary, they represented to many thoughtful observers the nation’s most conspicuous instance of  “conspicuous consumption” and class-enforcing extravagance.

 

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